Research

Potato late blight in Europe: The hard science

Didier Andrivon from INRA delves into the disease that once killed 1.5 million individuals in Ireland: Potato late blight, also known as Phytophthora Infestans It would be easy to think that a disease peaking over one hundred years ago is no longer a problem, but potato late blight continues to evolve and emerge in new places – similarly to the insidious reach of[Read More…]

Read More

Webinar: Feed the Future – Biotechnology Potato Partnership: Durable late blight resistance to South East Asia

The World Potato Congress (WPC) is pleased to be offering the first webinar in its 2020 series featuring Dr. David Douches on January 24, 2020 at 09:00 AM Eastern Standard Time (USA and Canada).  Abstract: The Feed the Future – Biotechnology Potato Partnership (BPP) is a five-year, multi-institution cooperative agreement between MSU, USAID, Simplot Company and other global institutions to develop and bring[Read More…]

Read More

‘Post-chemical world’ takes shape as agribusiness goes green

Agribusiness is increasingly turning to natural and sustainable alternatives to chemicals as consumers rebuff genetically modified foods and concerns grow over Big Ag’s role in climate change. At the heart of the trend are innovations that harness beneficial microorganisms in the soil, including seed-coatings of naturally occurring bacteria and fungi that can do the same work as traditional chemicals, from[Read More…]

Read More

Earliest roasted root vegetables, similar to modern potatoes, found in 170,000-year-old cave dirt

Charred fragments found in 170,000-year-old ashes in a cave in southern Africa are the earliest roasted root vegetables yet found. The finding suggest the real â€œpaleo diet” included lots of roasted vegetables rich in carbohydrates, similar to modern potatoes. “I think people were eating a very balanced diet, a combination of carbohydrates and proteins,” says team leader Lyn Wadley of the University of[Read More…]

Read More

Going Dutch: Potato store managers in Britain will need to split the sprout suppression load next year

Store managers may need to consider beyond the direct costs of the remaining approved sprout suppressants and towards adjusting store management strategies to keep the number of applications to a minimum,  and therefore helping to keep costs down, according to a recent news release issued by AHDB in the UK. As sprout suppressant chlorpropham (CIPC) will not have its licence[Read More…]

Read More

Potato-growing trial in the UK uncovers big savings

Potato growers with AHDB’s Farm Excellence Network in the UK have found a way of saving over £65 per hectare in production costs while increasing yield. Their findings come after a three-year trial programme for the network, and were revealed last week at Guardswell Farm for the Strategic Potato Farm Scotland Results Day. By reducing their cultivation process, as well[Read More…]

Read More

Potato to shed price flab in next ten days in India

Potato prices, which have shot up 60 per cent since October, may cool off in the next ten days as arrivals from Uttar Pradesh, the largest producer of the tuber in the country, are expected to increase substantially. Unseasonal rains since October in the potato growing areas of Punjab, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal had damaged the crop and slowed[Read More…]

Read More

Putting Scottish potato research into practice

Scotland’s newly appointed Lead Potato Researcher and Consultant will use his first public appearance in the role to highlight the importance of collaboration within the industry. Dr Phil Burgess, who has been employed by Scotland’s Rural College, the James Hutton Institute and SASA, will be among the speakers at next month’s annual SAC Association of Potato Producers in Perth. Dr[Read More…]

Read More

Webinar: Potato specialist explains how biotech project develops improved varieties for low-income farmers

The World Potato Congress (WPC) is very pleased to be offering this first webinar in its 2020 series featuring Dr. David Douches.  The Feed the Future – Biotechnology Potato Partnership (BPP) is a five-year, multi-institution cooperative agreement between MSU, USAID, Simplot Company and other global institutions to develop and bring to market improved potato products to low-income farmers in South East Asian countries.[Read More…]

Read More

Viewpoint: Science denialism threatens the potential of gene-edited crops

The genetic revolution being ushered in by gene-editing promises to markedly improve our crops by making them resistant to drought, disease and insects, and by enhancing their nutritional content. At first blush, it might appear that foods engineered to address some of our nagging health issues would be widely embraced. Not so for the organizations that have demonized other GM[Read More…]

Read More

James Hutton Institute: Boosting potato breeding for PCN resistance by application of modern technologies

Potato cyst nematodes (PCN), and the species of Globodera pallida in particular, have been spreading steadily across the UK over the past recent decades, posing significant threats to the sustainability of the potato industry, especially the seed potato industry, in Scotland. Despite both statutory and agronomic counter measures (primarily rotations and the use of nematicides) that have been taken, the increasing prevalence[Read More…]

Read More

New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application

Potatoes are important. They rank fourth among the world’s staple crops. In the United States, they are grown commercially in 30 states and valued at $4 billion annually. Potatoes are also susceptible to 160 different fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases, such as blackleg and soft rot diseases, which are caused by the bacterium Dickeya dianthicola. In 2015, an aggressive outbreak of[Read More…]

Read More

Biodegradable spray helps battle crop pathogens

A new sprayable bioplastic—made of cornstarch and other natural ingredients—offers potential as an effective method for delivering beneficial microbes to fight aflatoxins and other agricultural pathogens and pests. Aflatoxins are highly toxic substances produced by many species of Aspergillus fungi. Aflatoxins can contaminate corn, peanuts, cotton, and other crops, and at high doses they threaten the health of people, pets, fish, livestock,[Read More…]

Read More

Research: A quick and efficient hydroponic potato infection method for evaluating potato resistance and Ralstonia solanacearum virulence

Researchers say that potato, the third most important crop worldwide, plays a critical role in human food security. But, brown rot, one of the most destructive potato diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, results in huge economic losses every year. A quick, stable, low cost and high throughout method is required to meet the demands of identification of germplasm resistance to bacterial[Read More…]

Read More

Potato consumption as effective as carbohydrate gels for athletes: Study

Consuming potato puree during prolonged exercise works just as well as a commercial carbohydrate gel in sustaining blood glucose levels and boosting performance in trained athletes, a new study suggests. “The research has shown that ingesting concentrated carbohydrate gels during prolonged exercise promotes carbohydrate availability during exercise and improves exercise performance,” said study’s lead author Nicholas Burd, Professor at the[Read More…]

Read More

Canada: Manitoba company converts spuds into supplement that is being studied for its health benefits

An apple a day is all fine and good. But what about a potato? Or more precisely, a raw potato to fight chronic kidney disease. That’s at the heart of a soon-to-be-launched clinical trial of a made-in-Manitoba dietary supplement consisting of what’s called a resistant starch. The initiative comes out of one of the world’s leading centres for chronic kidney[Read More…]

Read More

Western Innovator: Aiding the fight against pink rot

Research by Jeff Miller, principal in Miller Research near Rupert, Idaho and other scientists is providing potato growers with more tools to use in controlling pink rot. The soil-borne disease is caused mainly by the pathogen Phytophthora erythroseptica. It infects potato roots, stolons and tubers, and if not controlled can lead to significant losses in potato fields and in storage..[Read More…]

Read More

‘A polerovirus, Potato Leafroll virus, alters plant‐vector interactions using three viral proteins’

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1111/pce.13684. Authors: MacKenzie F. PattonAurélie BakJordan SayreMichelle HeckClare L. Casteel Abstract: Potato leafroll virus (PLRV), genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae, is[Read More…]

Read More

Will CRISPR’s promise force the organic industry to reconsider its opposition to gene-edited crops?

Opposition to genetically modified (GM) crops advanced by organic activist groups (and official organizations like the US National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) or the EU’s European Court of Justice) is based on the claim that recombinant DNA technology introduces genes from one species into another. That’s not natural, these critics contend. By this definition, though, gene-editing techniques like CRISPR/Cas9 are[Read More…]

Read More

Who’s going to eat the first alien vegetable?

The crew of the International Space Station recently took delivery of a case of wine. A full dozen bottles of delicious red wine traveled from Earth, through the atmosphere, and ended up at the orbiting laboratory where six scientists have to let it sit for a year before sending it back. They can’t drink it, which is a bummer, but the experiment[Read More…]

Read More

Viewpoint: Developing countries need GMO, gene-edited crops to solve food security challenges

When Norman Borlaug won the Nobel peace prize in 1970 for his life-saving work on plant breeding, he said: “you can’t build a peaceful world on empty stomachs”. With one in every nine people on the planet still considered hungry, Borlaug’s statement has never been more relevant. Using such statistics, biotechnology proponents have said many times that the world must produce more food in[Read More…]

Read More

Lukie Pieterse, Editor and Publisher

[email protected]
[email protected]
Connect with me on LinkedIn
Follow me on Twitter
Visit Potato News Today on Facebook
Find us on Tumblr
About us

Kindly support our Advertisers – they make this information service possible:

SoilEssentials – TuberZone

Tolsma

Tomra Food

Parkland

Haith

Volm Companies

Greentronics

Receive breaking potato news in your inbox

Folks, you are most welcome to share your email address with us - and follow us - if you want to receive an email as soon as we publish a breaking news item on Potato News Today.

Join 1,863 other subscribers

Follow PNT on Twitter

Most read stories the past 24 hours

Entrapment: US potato processing industry ambushed by pandemic
Norfolk farmer chooses 'Tong Caretaker' to take care of valuable potato crop
Protect potato potential with amino acid based biostimulant, says adjuvant specialist company
In memoriam: Potato industry veteran Dr Joe Pavek passed away
Canada: Alberta's potato farmers facing mental, financial stress from production cuts
Chips are down: Asia faces COVID-19 fries shortage
Australia: Thomas Foods sells to Mitolo as meat and potatoes go separate ways
On-farm trials: Can brackish water be used for drip irrigating a potato crop?
Australian potato farmers outraged as $1billion COVID-19 cash splash is given to European colleagues
'So, God made a farmer'

Archive of monthly posts

Loyal readers from around the world – thank you for visiting Potato News Today! Stats below…

  • 609,112